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Local Records Office

Landlords Fear That Eviction Moratorium Will Lead Them to Foreclosure

COVID-19 has landlords on the edge due to tenants not being able to pay next month’s rent. Homeowners who rent out their homes face similar problems. When a homeowner is facing foreclosure, it will turn their dreams of homeownership right into a nightmare.

The process of foreclosure doesn’t just hurt the owner and the bank, according to the Local Records Office; it also will take a toll on the complete neighborhood. This article will cover why foreclosures have a real negative impact on your Los Angeles, California neighborhoods.

The Block Will Take a Hit

For the most part, a large neighborhood with a couple of foreclosures will not see a large decrease in property value as a consequence of those homes in particular.

Home appraisers will think about similar homes in your area, which might be in good standing when making an appraisal of your home. However, what if a large number of homes in the neighborhood tend to be foreclosed? Home appraisers, in basic, do not use the lowered prices of foreclosures because it does not give an accurate estimation of the market value of your home.

However, when the market is actually foreclosures, then the entire selling market exists in a lower value point. With only foreclosures to view value, your home will be priced accordingly for this new foreclosure market in case you are paying your monthly mortgage payments on time and you will be in good standing, according to the Local Records Office.

The Pandemic is Bad for Homeowner’s Interactions

Some associations provide events allowing neighbors to mingle and form their very own sense of community, and some HOAs even hire private security patrols to increase the safety of the neighborhood.

Somebody who is facing foreclosure is also someone that typically isn’t paying his or her HOA fees. This isn’t a problem if a couple of people are not paying their dues but when a lot of people are not paying their dues it becomes a much larger issue and the entire neighborhood will start to suffer. When this happens the HOA has 2 options which are to either lower the services they offer or to raise the fees on other homeowners.

Written in the paperwork, many homeowner’s associations have a chance to conduct foreclosure proceedings if the actual does not pay the month to month dues, just as a lender gets the right if the owner fails to pay the mortgage. However, as opposed to lending institutions, many HOAs do not need enough funding to pursue the difficulty to court.

Foreclosures Devalue Buyer’s Perceptions of Your Neighborhood

Regardless of what a property appraiser says about the price, what makes a house sell is its desirability to the buyer. In this, buyer’s perceptions have become important, and buyers have second thoughts about purchasing a home if the neighborhood looks like it is heading downhill. Although there are more laws preventing this from happening, sometimes bank-owned foreclosures are given no attention and during the period of a few months, it is clear that the home is abandoned. The landscape isn’t mowed.

The bushes tend to be overgrown and then, hoodlums spend a great afternoon breaking windows. All these are inner alarm bells to potential buyers who will see nearby abandoned areas as being a source of crime and neighborhood neglect.

If you are attempting to market your home in an area containing a lot of foreclosures it can be a hard thing to accomplish especially in Los Angeles, California. You are going to have to lower the price of your home in order to deal with all the foreclosures being at rock-bottom price ranges.

If you want to help out your situation a very important thing to do is to get with a neighbor, or a group meeting, and keep the property from looking abandoned. Park your car in front of the house, take turns mowing the yard, and if possible do the same for all of the abandoned homes in your community.